House Democrats

Impeachment looms large in House Democrats’ town halls over recess
Vulnerable freshmen face protests as safe-district incumbents explain process, Trump's offenses

Rep. Max Rose was one of the last Democrats to endorse the Trump impeachment inquiry. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump has been a central concern at town halls for House Democrats across the country, with both safe and vulnerable members of the caucus fielding questions from Trump’s defenders and voters who want him removed from office.

While recent polls suggest that support for impeaching the president has grown over the last three months — 58 percent of respondents to a Washington Post/Schar School poll this week approved of the House’s decision to launch an inquiry — Democrats have used feedback at town halls over the two-week October recess to assess how their constituents feel about the matter.

Pelosi, Trump engage in real-time messaging war on impeachment, legislating
Speaker says she ‘hopes’ president will work with Democrats, but Trump claims she’s ‘incapable’

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., joined by House Intelligence Chairman Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill on Wednesday. (Caroline Brehman/CQ Roll Call)

Speaker Nancy Pelosi and President Donald Trump engaged in a real-time messaging war Wednesday as the president live-tweeted his responses to the California Democrat’s weekly press conference.

Pelosi, who announced last week the House was conducting an “official” impeachment inquiry into Trump, opened the press conference by talking about legislation Democrats are crafting to address prescription drug prices. She said she hoped Trump would want to work on that despite the White House threatening to shut down the legislative process because of the impeachment inquiry.

House Democrats divided on how much evidence they need to impeach Trump
After unifying around an inquiry, the caucus remains split on actual impeachment

From left, Reps. Abigail Spanberger, Mikie Sherrill and Elissa Slotkin are among the Democrats who penned an op-ed saying the president might have committed impeachable offenses. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House Democrats finally agreed last week that they are conducting an impeachment inquiry, but as that probe quickly unfolds there are new divisions in the caucus about how much evidence they need to proceed with articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump.

Several Democrats believe the readout of a July 25 phone call of Trump asking Ukraine President Volodymyr Zelenskiy to investigate a potential 2020 opponent, former Vice President Joe Biden, and his son; Trump’s public statements admitting to the request; and a whistleblower complaint alleging White House lawyers and officials tried to “lock down” the call transcript is all the evidence they need to impeach.

Impeachment inquiry likely to move faster than House lawsuits, making some moot
Intelligence Committee may not go to court if administration stonewalls its subpoenas

House Intelligence Chairman Adam B. Schiff plans to remain in Washington through part of the break to schedule hearings and witness interviews and potentially prepare subpoenas. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House Democrats expect their impeachment inquiry to outpace ongoing court cases that were once seen as critical to their investigations into President Donald Trump.

That means some of those lawsuits — teed up as major separation-of-powers battles between the House and the Trump administration — could fizzle out or end up being dropped.

‘There is no rush to judgment’: Pelosi says no deadline for impeachment inquiry conclusion
That Trump thinks releasing transcript proves his innocence ‘only goes to further show he doesn’t understand right or wrong,’ speaker says

“The facts will determine the timeline” of the impeachment inquiry into President Donald Trump, Speaker Nancy Pelosi told reporters on Thursday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Speaker Nancy Pelosi told reporters Thursday that she’s not set a time frame for six investigating committees to reach a conclusion on whether the House should move forward with articles of impeachment against President Donald Trump.

“No, the facts will determine the timeline,” the California Democrats said when asked if she had set a deadline to conclude the impeachment inquiry she announced Tuesday. 

Democrats focusing impeachment inquiry on Trump pressuring Ukraine
With pivot from obstruction and corruption, Intelligence Committee steps into impeachment case spotlight

House Intelligence Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., conducts a news conference in the Capitol regarding the transcript of a phone call between President Donald Trump and Ukrainian President  Volodymyr Zelenskiy on Wednesday, September 25, 2019. (Tom William/CQ Roll Call)

House Democrats are focusing their impeachment inquiry on President Donald Trump pressuring Ukraine to dig up dirt on former Vice President Joe Biden, shifting the investigatory spotlight from the Judiciary Committee to the Intelligence Committee and providing a singular focus on which they can make the case for impeachment to the public.

Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s Tuesday announcement that she has directed the six House committees investigating Trump to proceed under the “umbrella” of an “official impeachment inquiry” led to some confusion about what had changed, given that the Judiciary Committee had been conducting an impeachment investigation for months.

Capitol Ink | Impeachment March

Democrats move closer to impeachment, but still disagree on how to get there
Ukraine allegations shift the caucus, but not to the same page

A woman holds an “impeach” sign in front of the Rayburn House Office Building on Monday as Reps. Al Green, D-Texas, and Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., speak to a group of protesters and the media about the need to impeach President Donald Trump. The event was slated to coincide with the House Judiciary Committee’s hearing on corruption, but the hearing was postponed. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

ANALYSIS | Several House Democrats’ positions on impeachment have shifted in the past 24 hours, but some have moved farther than others, leaving confusion about the caucus’ next steps.

Allegations that President Donald Trump withheld U.S. aid to Ukraine to spur the country to investigate a potential 2020 rival, Democratic presidential candidate and former Vice President Joe Biden, has given House Democrats’ flailing impeachment investigation new life. 

Democrats say they want to prioritize legislation over impeachment. Here’s their chance
Thursday release of prescription drug pricing bill provides opportunity for messaging shift

House Democratic Caucus Vice Chairwoman Katherine M. Clark and Caucus Chairman Hakeem Jeffries say House Democrats are most successful in communicating their policy messages directly to constituents in their districts. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

House Democratic leaders’ plan to release a top-priority prescription drug pricing bill on Thursday presents the caucus with an opportunity to refocus its messaging on legislating over investigating — one that many Democrats say is desperately needed.

Moderate Democrats in particular are concerned that the caucus’s policy work isn’t breaking through the impeachment cloud that has overshadowed the 116th Congress.

Pelosi on Trump investigations: ‘We are, from a timing standpoint, where we need to be’
Speaker still refuses to clarify whether she thinks it’s appropriate to call the investigations an impeachment inquiry

Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., won’t call Democrats’ investigations into President Donald Trump an impeachment inquiry, but says timing-wise they're where they need to be. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Speaker Nancy Pelosi on Thursday again declined to say whether she thinks House Democrats’ investigations into President Donald Trump are a formal impeachment inquiry, but she said the probe is proceeding on track. 

“I’m very pleased [with] the path we’re on and the progress we’ve made,” the California Democrat said. “We are, from a timing standpoint, where we need to be.”