russia

Senate seeks to make sure that hacking election systems is a federal crime
Senators unanimously pass narrow legislation, but no broad action is expected

The Senate passed a bill Wednesday that would clarify that hacking election systems and machines is a federal crime. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The Senate took another small step to improve election security Wednesday evening, even as there is no plan for a broader debate on the floor.

As the chamber was closing for the evening, senators passed by unanimous consent a bipartisan bill out of the Senate Judiciary Committee designed to make sure that hacking election systems is actually a federal crime.

With no evidence, Nunes warns that Democrats are colluding with Mueller to create ‘narrative’
It’s common for committee staff to be in touch with witnesses to schedule hearings, negotiate time limits, set parameters of questioning

Rep. Devin Nunes, the top Republican on the House Intelligence Committee, claimed without evidence that Democrats were working with former special counsel Robert S. Mueller III to create a “narrative” about his investigation into 2016 Russian election interference and whether President Donald Trump obstructed that probe. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Devin Nunes is raising concerns that Democrats are conspiring with former special counsel Robert S. Mueller III to create a “narrative” about his 22-month investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 elections that paints President Donald Trump and his associates in a bad light.

Nunes, the top Republican on the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence that will interview Mueller on July 24, did not provide any evidence to support his claim.

Democrats renew impeachment inquiry calls after Trump’s racist tweets
Reps. Al Green, Madeleine Dean among House Democrats who resumed impeachment chatter on Monday

Rep. Al Green, D-Texas, resumed his call to impeach President Donald Trump on Monday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

Rep. Al Green has promised to force a vote "this month" on impeaching President Donald Trump after the president fired off a series of tweets on Sunday, widely condemned as racist, in which he told four minority Democratic congresswomen to “go back” to the countries of their ancestry before trying to fix America’s problems.

Other House Democrats renewed their pleas to party leadership Monday to open a Judiciary Committee impeachment inquiry into Trump.

Mueller hearing might be delayed and lengthened so more members can question him
Republicans and junior Democrats on Judiciary panel had grumbled at original 2-hour format

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler had originally said Mueller’s testimony would be limited to two hours. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)

Special counsel Robert S. Mueller III’s testimony before Congress might be delayed until July 24, a week later than originally scheduled, to accommodate questioning from more members, multiple media outlets reported Friday.

Mueller and House Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler have been negotiating the framework of the hearing for weeks and announced yesterday that the special counsel’s testimony, initially scheduled for next Wednesday, July 17, would last no more than two hours.

America is woefully unprepared for cyber-warfare
From hacks to misinformation campaigns, its adversaries are winning in the virtual battleground

The U.S. military is increasingly adept at mounting cyberattacks in places like Russia and Iran, but America’s computers are almost completely defenseless. (iStock)

War in cyberspace is fully on, and the United States is losing it, according to about two dozen national security experts.

The U.S. military is increasingly adept at mounting cyberattacks in places like Russia and Iran, but America’s computers are almost completely defenseless. Without strong protections, offensive attacks can be invitations for disaster instead of deterrents.

No new legislative momentum after election security briefings
House has passed legislation, but there is no plan for moving a Senate bill

Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., speaks with reporters as he leaves the closed briefing on election security in the Capitol on Wednesday. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call)

Sen. Marco Rubio emerged from a closed briefing on the Trump administration’s efforts to secure elections and made a renewed push for his own bipartisan deterrence legislation, even as he acknowledged there has not been momentum.

“In my view, they’re doing everything you can do,” Rubio said of the administration efforts. “Election interference is a broadly used term, and understand this is psychological warfare. It’s designed to weaken America from the inside out, to drive divisions internally so we fight with each other, to undermine our confidence in the elections and in our democracy and particularly to undermine individual candidates either because they don’t like that candidate or because they know someone else.”

‘Mike Wallace Is Here’ shows how we got here
Political Theater podcast, Episode 80

“Mike Wallace Is Here” documents the career of the legendary journalist — as well as his role in creating the political and news world we live in now. (Bryan Bedder/Getty Images file photo)

The new film “Mike Wallace Is Here” shows how legendary journalist Mike Wallace pioneered holding the powerful accountable, be they politicians, celebrities or real estate developers. But today’s world is one where journalists are in danger and the credibility of its practitioners is constantly called into question. What happened?

On the latest Political Theater podcast, the documentary’s director, Avi Belkin, discusses the arc of Wallace’s career and where things started to shift. In the course of compiling the movie — from thousands of hours of archival footage from CBS’ “60 Minutes” program that made Wallace a star — Belkin says he noticed just how much richer and articulate conversation was among journalists and the subjects they covered. And he argues that the audience bears a responsibility in all this too. 

House Ways and Means sues to get Trump tax returns
The committee called the government’s refusal to turn over the records ‘an extraordinary attack’ on congressional oversight

Ways and Means chairman Rep. Richard Neal, D-Mass., stops to speak to reporters as he walks down the House steps after the final votes of the week on May 17, 2019. The committee filed a lawsuit Tuesday to quickly enforce its subpoena for President Donald Trump’s tax returns. (Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call file photo)

The House Ways and Means Committee filed a lawsuit Tuesday to quickly enforce its subpoena for President Donald Trump’s tax returns, calling the government’s refusal to turn over the records “an extraordinary attack” on congressional oversight.

The lawsuit in federal district court in Washington is the first legal action from House Democrats to enforce a subpoena among the numerous investigations into the Trump administration launched since taking control of the chamber in January.

Finger-wagging Trump mockingly tells Putin to stay out of 2020 election
‘Don't meddle in the election, president,’ POTUS says as Russian leader chuckles

President Donald Trump was criticized last year for siding with Russian President Vladimir Putin’s denials of meddling in U.S. elections. On Friday in Japan Trump appeared to mock such accusations. (Chris McGrath/Getty Images file photo)

With a wag of his finger, President Donald Trump on Friday mocked nearly 40 percent of Americans who believe his 2016 campaign colluded with Russia — and the 25 percent who think it’s possible it did.

Trump’s latest defiant move came as he met one on one Friday at a G-20 summit in Osaka, Japan, with Russian President Vladimir Putin. He had ignored a question last week from CQ Roll Call in the Oval Office about whether he planned to discuss Russia’s election 2016 meddling and warn Putin to avoid a repeat next year. But he was asked again Friday and took the question — then once again went where previous American chief executives would not.

Trump jets to Japan to wing it at G-20 summit as Iran tensions build
Official unable to lay out agenda for high-stakes meetings with Xi, Putin and MBS

Air Force One arrives with President Donald Trump for a rally in Montoursville, Pa., on May 20. (Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call file photo)

After a week of brinksmanship and backing down, President Donald Trump  heads to a G-20 summit in Japan on Wednesday for talks with other world leaders amid a volatile confrontation with Iran and stalled trade talks with China.

Senior administration officials made clear this week that Trump, who admits his negotiating style is based on gut feelings and big bets, will largely wing it at the meeting. Officials declined to describe any set agenda for the president’s talks with world leaders, including Chinese President Xi Jinping, Russian President Vladimir Putin and South Korean President Moon Jae-in.